This image shows Saturn, its rings, and four of its icy satellites. Three satellites (Tethys, Dione, and Rhea) are visible against the darkness of space, and another smaller satellite (Mimas) is visible against Saturn's cloud tops very near the left horizon and just below the rings.

 

The dark shadows of Mimas and Tethys are also visible on Saturn's cloud tops, and the shadow of Saturn is seen across part of the rings. Saturn, second in size only to Jupiter in our Solar System, is 120,660 km (75,000 mi) in diameter at its equator (the ring plane).

 

Saturn's rings consist mostly of ice particles ranging from microscopic dust to boulders in size. These particles orbit Saturn in a vast disk that is a mere 100 meters (330 feet) or so thick. The rings' thinness contrasts with their huge diameter--for instance 272,400 km (169,000 mi) for the outer part of the bright A ring, the outermost ring visible here.

 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/USGS

Saturn and 4 Icy Moons in Natural Color
Saturn and 4 Icy Moons in Natural Color
Saturn System Montage
Saturn and its rings
A Change of Seasons on Saturn
Composition Differences within Saturn's Rings
Hovering Over Titan
Saturn